Learn more about associations that disseminates Brazilian music in Europe, such as Club du Choro in Paris

Choro is all over the word. This typically Brazilian music style has an association in Paris called Club du Choro. This is very important to disseminate Brazilian culture and music.

Picture: XII Festival Internacional do Reencontro do Choro em Paris, 2016/ Facebook Club du Choro de Paris

Picture: Facebook Club du Choro de Paris

The Club du Choro was created in 2011 to promote Choro in Europe. The members of the club are: president Guy Le Roux (violonist), Maria Inês Guimarães (pianist), Julien Hamard e Beatriz Gomes. Their main influences are: Pixinguinha, Jacob do Bandolim, Ernesto Nazareth and Chiquinha Gonzaga.

The association offers open courses to the public. The classes are collective practices and it helps the students to develop musical technique and interpretation. It also approaches rhythmic patterns and improvisation. At the end of the courses, the students perform at concerts.

Some of the courses available

– Orchestra Workshop

The students study and play Choro in groups. The repertory is diversified and the list includes many Lineu Bravo clients, such as: Chico Buarque, João Lyra, Jayme Vignoli. The teachers: Thierry Moncheny, Jef Calmard, Maria Inês Guimarães and Wander Pio.

– Instrumental Workshops

This course offers percussion and tambourine classes, included in the universe of Brazilian rhythm, for instance: choro, maxixe, carioca samba,  maracatu,  ciranda.

– Guitar classes

The club offers 7-string and 6-string guitar classes with Thierry Moncheny as a teacher.

Picture: Club du Choro de Paris

Picture: Club du Choro de Paris

– “Cavaco”

Cavaco classes for begginers and professionals, with the teacher Jef Calmard.

Choro Groups in Paris

Besides the courses, they organize Choro performances every week. Many groups play Choro in Paris, such as:

– Bécots da Lapa

Picture: Club du Choro de Paris

Picture: Club du Choro de Paris

– Duo in Uno

Picture: Club du Choro de Paris

Picture: Club du Choro de Paris

– Maria Inês Guimarães Quartet

Picture: Club du Choro de Paris

Picture: Club du Choro de Paris

– Pingo de choro

Picture: Club du Choro de Paris

Picture: Club du Choro de Paris

Source: Clud du Choro de Paris

- Club du Choro de Paris Facebook page

- Clud du Choro de Paris Website

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The emotional music genre is a mix of European and Brazilian music elements

Choro was considered the first typically Brazilian popular urban music style and was created with a mix of European dance elements and Brazilian popular songs, with a lot of African influence. Brazilians celebrate the Choro National Day every april 23th.

DIADOCHORINHO-01

It was an emotional way of performing a melody and just became a music genre in the 20th century. With the end of the slavery, in 1850, a new urban middle class appeared, and this public was the one that most got interested in Choro.

The musician Henrique Cazes, who wrote a book about Choro, explains the origin of the word: – “It is a sentimental way to change European dance into Brazilian songs”.

The musical groups that play Choro are called Rodas de Choro, and the musicians chorões. The instruments of this genre are: flute, mandolin, cavaquinho, clarinet, saxophone, 6 and 7 string guitar and tambourine.

The Chorão has all the freedom to play Choro melodies and he doesn’t need to follow exactly the musical notes on the score. The final result depends, therefore, on the musician interpretation.

Pixinguinha Influence

Alfredo da Rocha Vianna Filho, the brilliant “Pixinguinha”, was very important for the formation of the music style. He introduced African-Brazilian and rural music elements. The Choro Nacional Day is celebrated on April 23rd, the day the composer was born.

Apart from Pixinguinha, a lot of other composers have stood out performing Choro, such as: Jacob do Bandolim, Ernesto Nazareth, Chiquinha Gonzaga, Waldir Azevedo, Paulinho da Viola, Zequinha de Abreu e Ademilde Fonseca.

Source: Clube do Choro e Estação Musical

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- Learn more about Samba

In 1940, the rhythm becomes a Brazilian symbol

‘Samba’, the most popular Brazilian music genre, has European and African origins, but it has taken over the country with black culture symbols.

The word was first mentioned in 1838 in a newspaper of Pernambuco called “O Capuceiro”. In Rio de Janeiro, the word ‘samba’ appears only in the late twentieth century, always linked with rural feasts, the black community and Bahia.

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This music genre started taking shape with urban characteristics and percussion instruments, and now it has been consolidated as the main music style of Rio de Janeiro.

The expansion of samba took place thanks to two aspects: the newly-launched radio and the encouraging to the carnival by schools of the time.

In the 1940’s, the rhythm became a Brazilian symbol and earned status and international fame. Nowadays, the world sees Brazil as the birthplace of Carnival.

The word ‘samba’ has created solid roots and, as a result, a lot of etymological branching, such as samba-choro, samba de terreiro, samba-enredo, samba de gafieira, samba-rock, etc.

The first composers have built a cultural legacy. Some of them are: Jozé Luiz de Moraes, o Caninha, Heitor dos Prazeres, João da Baiana, Pixinguinha e Donga.

The Samba National Day is celebrated on December 2nd and was created to honor Ary Barroso. Firstly, the date was celebrated only in Bahia, but it turned out to become national.

Source: Almanaque do Samba

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